Eruption Mtg. in Pahoa 1/2 July 31, 2018

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Eruption Mtg. in Pahoa - 2/2 July 31, 2018

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Resources and Information

Great Website for Resources and Information

 This is a place to share posts and information you would like incorporated into the website www.punalavaflow2018.com.  Visit www.punalavaflow2018.com to find resources to help you and our community.  Share something you found or add your own resources or information here on Facebook.  This is not a new site, it is for information on to get help and stay empowered. Mahalo! 

Hawaii County Civil Defense Map Showing Fissures, Flows and Roadblocks

This map is updated daily. Showing Leilani Estates and surrounding area. 

Lava Cam - Fissure 8 View

Harry Durgin is providing an excellent resource for everyone by providing a cam feed of Fissure 8 that is refreshed every 2 minutes. 

Civil Defense Updates

Civil Defense Update - August 2, 2018 at 6 AM

 A message from COUNTY OF HAWAII

This is a Civil Defense message for Thursday, August 2 at 6:00 in the morning. 
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports earthquakes continue at the Kilauea Summit.  Fissure 8 continues to erupt sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui; creating a large laze plume. 

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but request motorists stay on the pavement and be alert for changes in roadway conditions between mile markers 28 and 32.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to the extreme hazard of overflows and other breakouts.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume. Stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is open Monday to Friday at the Pahoa Community Center. Hours of operation are 8 AM to 6 PM weekdays and 8 AM to 4 PM on Saturdays. 
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

There will be an eruption information meeting in Volcano Village tonight at Cooper Center at 5:30 p.m. regarding emergency preparations.

We are on watch 24-hours a day for your safety.

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.

Civil Defense Update - August 1, 2018 at 6 AM

 A message from COUNTY OF HAWAII

This is a Civil Defense message for Wednesday, August 1 at 6:00 in the morning. 
 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports earthquakes continue at the Kilauea Summit.  Fissure 8 continues to erupt sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui; creating a large laze plume. As of last evening the Western edge of the flow had not advanced southward and remained approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki Boat Ramp at Isaac Hale Park.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but request motorists stay on the pavement and be alert for changes in roadway conditions between mile markers 28 and 32.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to the extreme hazard of overflows and other breakouts.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume. Stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is located at the Pahoa Community Center. Hours of operation are 8 AM to 6 PM weekdays and 8 AM to 4 PM on Saturdays. 
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

We are on watch 24-hours a day for your safety.

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.

Civil Defense Update 7/31/18 at 4 PM

 A message from COUNTY OF HAWAII

This is a Civil Defense message for Tuesday, July 31 at 4:00 in the afternoon. 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. No overflows were reported this morning. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11 after the 8:00 am collapse event at Halemaumau crater. Between mile marker 28 and 32, motorists are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

**Reminder: There will not be a test of the Outdoor Warning Siren System for the month of August. Testing will resume Tuesday, September 4, 2018.**

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center, located at 15-3022 Kauhale St., Pahoa. Hours of operation are 8 am to 6 pm weekdays and 8 am to 4 pm on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

We are on watch 24-hours a day for your safety.

Civil Defense Update 7/30/18 6 AM

 A message from COUNTY OF HAWAII

This is a Civil Defense message for Monday, July 30 at 6:00 in the morning. 

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a 4.1 magnitude occurred on the south flank of Kilauea last night just after 10 PM that was felt as far away as Kalapana to Hilo. No damage was reported.  Earthquakes continue at Kilauea Summit and Fissure 8 continues to erupt into the channel sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui, creating a large laze plume. HVO field crews report fluctuations in the channel level with spillovers occurring locally along the channel.  Yesterday’s flyover reports the margin of the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki Boat Ramp at Isaac Hale Park with the main ocean entry approximately 0.75 miles northeast of Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but requests motorists between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement, be alert for changes in roadway conditions, and drive with caution.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

-Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.

-Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware of channel spillovers and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.

-The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

-The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pahoa Community Center located at 15-3016 Kauhale St., Pahoa. Hours of operations is 8 AM to 6 PM weekdays and 8 AM to 4 PM on Saturdays. 

-Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani Street in Hilo.

We are on watch 24-hours a day for your safety.  This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.

FEMA Information

FEMA has an online area for those affected by the May, 2018 Lava Flow. You can sign up online by clicking on the link below.

EPA Combined Air Monitoring Map

 This viewer has been created through the collaboration of the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency, Hawaii State Department of Health, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It is intended to provide the public with information about air quality and potential health impacts from the current eruption event. Please monitor Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency messages and alerts for eruption-related updates and specific instructions. 

USGS HVO UPDATES

Aug. 14th, 2018 USGS HVO Update

 

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY STATUS REPORT
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 9:31 AM HST (Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 19:31 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity and Hazards Overview

Kīlauea Volcano has remained quiet for over a week now, with no further collapse events at the summit, and, with the exception of a small, crusted-over pond of lava deep inside the fissure 8 cone and a few scattered ocean entries, no lava flowing in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Earthquake and deformation data show no net accumulation, withdrawal, or significant movement of subsurface magma or pressurization as would be expected if the system was building toward a resumption of activity.

It is too soon to tell if this change represents a temporary lull or the end of the LERZ eruption and/or summit collapse activity. In 1955, similar pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during an 88-day-long LERZ eruption. During the Mauna Ulu eruption (1969-1974), a 3.5 month pause occurred in late 1971.

Despite the eruptive pause, hazardous conditions remain in the LERZ and at the summit as described below:

● The fissure 8 crater still hosts a small amount of lava that currently does not enter the existing channel. Should the eruption rate increase, the configuration of outflow around the vent could change, sending lava in new directions. Possible flow paths to the north have been outlined in HVO’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone hazard assessment (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-185/USGS%20Preliminary%20Analysis_LERZ_7-15-18_v1.1.pdf).

● Resupply of magma could lead to the reactivation of fissures other than fissure 8, or the opening of entirely new fissures along the ERZ, potentially leading to new areas being inundated by lava.

● The new lava flow field in the LERZ includes large areas of still-hot, rugged, and unstable lava surfaces that are subject to collapse.

● Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions have greatly decreased from LERZ vents, but high levels of SO2 may persist in downwind areas.

● Tephra (fragments of glassy lava) have accumulated to thicknesses of more than several feet near fissure 8. This material breaks down over time into small, glassy particles that can be blown on the wind and create an eye, respiratory, and skin irritant. Disturbing the tephra by sweeping, shoveling, or driving over it will break the fragile pieces into a glassy dust. The tephra can also conceal underlying hazards such as ground cracks, holes, and debris from destroyed structures.

● The LERZ ocean entry is minimally active at this time, but continued laze and lava delta collapses remain a concern. Hydrovolcanic explosions are much less of a concern now, as they require high eruption rates with lava entering the ocean, but they may still occur.

● At the summit, additional earthquakes, rockfalls, and ground cracking can occur with no warning. Steep crater walls destabilized by months of earthquakes could be prone to collapse for weeks or months to come, even without further ground shaking (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-184/Summit%20scenarios_7-5-18.pdf).

● Summit SO2 emissions rates are lower than at any time since late 2007 and are not currently a hazard.

● Resuspended ash in the summit region remains a local hazard during strong winds.

● As the summit continues to adjust to changes in the underlying magmatic system, additional, and potentially damaging, earthquakes are possible. Hawai’i is known for frequent earthquakes, so all residents should be prepared for damaging earthquakes.

● If magma returns to the shallow reservoir beneath Kilauea’s summit, groundwater could encounter subsurface regions of high temperature, prompting explosions of uncertain size.

● More dangerous explosive activity at the summit remains very unlikely in the near term. For more information, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-184/Summit%20scenarios_7-5-18.pdf

● Aftershocks from the May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake below Kilauea’s south flank will continue for months more and could produce moderate, damaging events at any time.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to closely monitor Kīlauea’s activity, including overflights of the rift zone and summit as needed, supplemented with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flights and daily visual observations. Field crews will be deployed to the LERZ and the summit areas to collect data and to install and repair monitoring instruments. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

MORE INFORMATION

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov
 

August 9, 2018 at 9:06 AM USGS HVO Update

 

Kīlauea Volcano Status Report
Thursday, August 9, 2018, 9:06 AM HST
--------------------
Lower East Rift Zone

Activity and lava output from Fissure 8 remains low and there have been no signs of reactivation or new intrusion. Up-rift of Fissure 8, Fissures 9, 10, and 24, and down-rift Fissures 13, 23, 3, 21 and 7, continue to steam. Ground crews and overflights continue to monitor these for signs of new activity. This morning's overflight crew observed a crusted lava pond deep inside the steaming cone at a level significantly lower than when viewed Tuesday morning.

The significance of this change is not yet clear and hazardous conditions remain in the area. HVO field crews and the UAS team will monitor activity throughout the day and overnight.

It is common for eruptions to wax and wane or pause completely. A return to high levels of lava discharge or new outbreaks in the area of active fissures could occur at any time.

Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

---------------------
Middle East Rift Zone

Gas measurements of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō plume taken on August 6 and 7 indicated a reduced SO2 emission rate lower than the August 3 measurement and similar to what has been observed over the past three months. No active lava was observed in the crater on an overflight on August 6th. This morning, the steam plume appears wispy and intermittent.

A magnitude-4.4 earthquake occurred southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō this morning at 6:50 a.m. The earthquake had no significant effect on the status of Kīlauea activity except to generate a brief dust plume from Puʻu ʻŌʻō several minutes later.

----------------------
Summit

The volcano's summit remains quiet, except for the small occasional rockfall, following the most recent collapse at 11:55 a.m. HST August 2nd. This continues a significant departure from the pattern of seismicity and deformation over the past several months, with very low rates of seismicity continuing today. Except for a very gradual deflation, the deformation at the summit as measured by tiltmeter and GPS instruments has stopped.

Summit and LERZ changes considered together imply that the rate of magma leaving the summit to feed the lower East Rift Zone eruption has significantly decreased. How long this condition will persist is unknown. It is possible that outflow will pick up again, resulting in renewed summit area deflation leading to another collapse event and renewed eruption vigor on the LERZ.

HVO will continue to monitor Kīlauea closely for any signs of change in activity.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

#KilaueaEruption #KilaueaErupts #Kilauea #volcano #volcanoes #usgs#LERZ #KilaueaSummit

Aug. 1, 2018 USGS HVO Update 12:29 PM

 

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY STATUS REPORT
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, August 1, 2018, 12:29 PM HST (Wednesday, August 1, 2018, 22:29 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. No overflows were reported this morning and lava levels in the more distant portions of the channel system appear low. At the coast, the south edge of the lava flow has not advanced westward in the past day, and remains less than 175 m (0.1 mi) from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park. Lava is actively entering the ocean along a broad 2 km (1.2 mi) flow front centered near the former Ahalanui Beach Park.

No other fissures are active this morning.

Yesterday afternoon, a brush fire started near the PGV access road at the south edge of the fissure 8 channel that burned much of the vegetation around the road as well as the west side of Pu`u Honua`ula. The fire also damaged one of our telemetry hubs that relayed data from several geophysical instruments in the area as well as the PGcam. We will try to get this repaired as soon as possible but the public should be aware that these operations may not be restored for some time.

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no significant changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. The interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that drifts downwind and can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs. Close to the ocean entry, flying debris from explosive interaction between lava and water is a primary hazard. Additionally, submarine magma-water interaction can result in explosive activity beyond the visible lava delta, creating a hazard that extends offshore. The lava delta is unstable because it is built up to 800 m (0.5 mi) from the former coastline on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low although higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible at any time. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should remain informed and heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

Seismicity at Kilauea's summit is back to 20-35 earthquakes per hour after the collapse event at 7:59 AM HST July 31 which was very similar to previous events. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit are very low. This gas and minor amounts of ash resuspended by wind are being transported downwind. Small bursts of ash and gas may coincide with the summit collapse events. The summit region is occasionally impacted by sulfur dioxide from the lower East Rift Zone eruption.

Forecasts of ashfall under forecast wind conditions: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/ash_information.html

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts).

MORE INFORMATION

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov
 

July 31, 2018 10:17 AM HST

 

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY STATUS REPORT
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, July 31, 2018, 10:17 AM HST (Tuesday, July 31, 2018, 20:17 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. No overflows were reported this morning and lava levels in the more distant portions of the channel system appear low. At the coast, the south edge of the lava flow has not advanced westward in the past day, and remains less than 175 m (0.1 mi) from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park. Lava along the south edge of the flow was oozing more to the east but there were a few ooze-outs to the west that were distant from the coast and not directly threatening Pohoiki. Lava is actively entering the ocean along a broad 2 km (1.2 mi) flow front centered near the former Ahalanui Beach Park with a more minor entry building a pointed delta near the south edge of the flow.

No other fissures are active this morning.

Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

The most recent map of lava flows can be found at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no significant changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high. VOG information can be found at https://vog.ivhhn.org/

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. The interaction of lava with the ocean creates "laze", a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that drifts downwind and can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs. Close to the ocean entry, flying debris from explosive interaction between lava and water is a primary hazard. Additionally, submarine magma-water interaction can result in explosive activity beyond the visible lava delta, creating a hazard that extends offshore. The lava delta is unstable because it is built up to 800 m (0.5 mi) from the former coastline on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low although higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible at any time. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should remain informed and heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

A magnitude-4.5 earthquake occurred beneath the south caldera at 12:30 AM. Seismicity at Kilauea's summit decreased after the collapse event at 7:59 AM HST July 31 which was very similar to previous events. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit are very low. This gas and minor amounts of ash resuspended by wind are being transported downwind. Small bursts of ash and gas may coincide with the summit collapse events. The summit region is occasionally impacted by sulfur dioxide from the lower East Rift Zone eruption.

Forecasts of ashfall under forecast wind conditions: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/ash_information.html

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts).

MORE INFORMATION

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov
 

Video May 18, 2018 - Fire and Fury

Video by Mick Kalber and Hot Seat Hawaii

Civil Defense Update 5/17/18 6 PM

New outbreak at Ho'okupu south of Leilani Ave. 


Courtesy of Andrew Hara

5/15/18 Halema'uma'u Ash Cloud

Andrew Hara

Map Showing Area of Eruptions

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Byron Matthews Drone Footage 5/11/18

Leilani Estates Lava Damage