What's Happening

Check out events, meetings and news concerning Leilani Estates

LCA Special Membership Meeting, Sat. Oct. 27, 2018

Thanks to Ann Kalber for videotaping this meeting. Meeting was held at Leilani Community Association Pavilion.

Please Help Leilani Estates

 

Since May 4, 2018, Leilani Estates has been under seige by earthquakes, fissures, and lava eruptions. Many residents have lost their homes and our beautiful subdivision has suffered a lot of damage. 

I am the webmaster of www.leilaniestates.org. I have gotten approval from LCA Board members to set up a Paypal Account for donations through LCA's Tax ID#.  Donations will be tax deductible. 

Thank you for any help. 

Donate to Help Leilani Estates

Google Lava Flow Map

Homes Lost

From Dane DuPont regarding lost homes map

 

Map Of Homes Lost for 6/1/2018

Sorry about the lack of updates, decided to take a new approach for this assessment. Took some time, and isn't perfect but it is a more sound method and aligns closer to the criteria the County is using to determine homes lost.

Total homes destroyed by new criteria: 228.

Improvements to map display and techniques used in assessing 'homes lost' have been made. Home status in this map now relies on the use of Hawaii County, Real Property Tax Department's publicly released information. The information from the County is used to locate, address, and account for homes lost. This allows for more accurate way to distinguish between a 'home' and a 'structure'. Each home now lists it's associated address.

Addresses are determined to be 'lost' via on the ground reporting, aerial comparisons, USGS lava flow surveys, and disclosures by home owners. Homes that have been damaged by cracks, SO2, and even properties totally surrounded by lava were not counted. Also, since this change in methodology relies on tax records many un-permitted homes, and Ohana homes on the same parcel as a primary home, have been excluded.

If there are in errors seen in locations of homes marked (not just the slightly off placement of dots) or something that is missed please post in the comments. My condolences to all homeowners who have lost their homes and displaced families. This is a hard time for everyone involved.

Mahalo to Jen Naylor Sexton for assisting in the map parcel examination and compiling a list of addresses. Heath Dalton for his accurate and robust information on status of specific homes. Ryan Finlay for his many, many contributions. And all residents that have contributed in this hard time by providing information about the homes and neighborhoods in which they lived.

New Map: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer…

I am going to keep the old image updated and provide a count that includes the old criteria for a home; permitted or occupied leading up to the fissure activity. Image and count found here: https://imgur.com/a/KARMU9F

Emergency Planning Webpage Added

Be Prepared!

 

Leilani Community Association is adding a new webpage, Emergency Planning to its website. The purpose is to provide current information to help you prepare for emergencies such as earthquakes, hurricanes, defense issues, floods, lava flow evacuation and water contamination. FEMA, Civil Defense, Community
Emergency Response Team (CERT) gives members the necessary planning tools in the event of these emergencies.

We suggest you take time to read through this material and plan accordingly. This page also provides links and contact information. If you have questions or concerns, please reach out to these agencies. For questions regarding water contamination, call or email LCA at lca@hawaii.rr.com or fill out the contact form. 


Lava Flow, Leilani Estates, May 4, 2018

About Us

E Komo Mai - Welcome to Leilani Estates

Leilani Estates is a beautiful, rural subdivision in the Puna District on Hawai'i Island.  Our Community has well-maintained, paved roads, one-acre lots, an active Neighborhood Watch program, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), and a volunteer Board of Directors.
There is a Community Center with a multipurpose Pavilion, playground, fitness trail, ball fields and meeting facilities. We have a variety of weekly activities and classes available to Leilani Estates residents.
Leilani Estates is close to Pahoa Town, a quaint town with an eclectic mixture of old and new. There is a variety of services, shopping and restaurants in Pahoa, including post office, banks, healthcare, an all-purpose community park and community pool. Down the road there are plenty of ocean activities with parks, swimming, snorkeling, fishing, surfing and even a hot pond heated by the Volcano. Leilani Estates is approximately 30 minutes south of Hilo and an hour from Volcanoes National Park. 

Plenty to do in Leilani Estates

Check out the monthly activities and classes offered in Leilani Estates - PLEASE NOTE DUE TO LAVA EMERGENCY THERE ARE NO CLASSES OR ACTIVITIES

Community Calendar

Leilani Estates Community Calendar includes monthly meetings and events - LCA Monthly BOD Meetings are resuming but being held at Nanawale Community Center in the interim. 

Leilani Estates History

 

The Leilani Estates subdivision was formed in 1964. The name "Leilani" in Hawaiian means "royal child" or "heavenly lei". The Hawaiian name for the Leilani Estates subdivision area is Keahialaka. 

In one of the many stories about Pele, the following is a literal translation of the account of her taking Kilauea:

“When Pele came to the island Hawaiʻi, she first stopped at a place called Keahialaka (Ke-ahi-a-Laka) in the district of Puna. From this place. she began her inland journey toward the mountains. As she passed on her way, there grew within her an intense desire to go at once and see ʻAilāʻau, the god to whom Kīlauea belonged, and find a resting-place with him as the end of her journey. She came up, but ʻAilāʻau was not in his house. Of a truth he had made himself thoroughly lost. He had vanished because he knew that this one coming toward him was Pele. He had seen her toiling down by the sea at Keahialaka. Trembling dread and heavy fear overpowered him. He ran away and was entirely lost. When Pele came to that pit she laid out the plan for her abiding home, beginning at once to dig up the foundations. She dug day and night and found that this place fulfilled all her desires. Therefore, she fastened herself tight to Hawaiʻi for all time.”

Leilani History - Understanding the Two Sections

By Jay Turkovsky, President of LCA

  

In the beginning (1960’s) a few land developers got together and created Leilani Estates. As most people on Hawaii Island know, there was little concern regarding the effort outside of profit.

On January 29, 1969, Edwin I Honda, Director of Regulatory Agencies, signed the Charter of Incorporation of Leilani Community Association for the petitioners, Richard Henderson, D. W. Rose, and Kenneth B Griffin, as a perpetual corporation under the laws of the State of Hawaii. Corporate Officers were named as: President, John La Plante; Secretary, Yutaka Imata; Vice President, Peter Shayne; and Treasurer, Kenneth Griffin.

The Charter of Incorporation sets forth what became law regarding what properties LCA included, as defined by Block and Lot numbers identified on the Plat Map approved by Hawaii County on February 15, 1960. (The map is available on the County’s website as s1458.tif.) The subdivision, called Leilani Estates, was created on land at Keahialaka, Puna, Hawaii for the owners Ramon Chiya, Kenneth Ing, and Maurice Takasaki, doing business as Hawaii Land Hui, a Limited Partnership, in Honolulu. The Plat includes all properties in what were to become Section 1 and LCA.

The creation of Leilani Community Association through the Charter of Incorporation sets forth a series of laws that the association is legally bound to follow on behalf of the owners of properties identified in the charter. All property owners are Members and own 1/2046th of the 501c4 of LCA, non-profit corporation. Some highlights of the Charter include:

· operate for general public social welfare and safety,

· to own, hold, repair and maintain all roads except Leilani Avenue, and maintain landscaping adjacent to all roads,

· to protect and promote civic betterments and social improvements for the good of the owners and including the provisions of the CC&Rs,

· receive and administer funds to conduct the above duties.

· there shall be a Board of Directors of three or more, since revised to seven.

The above is the legal description of what is currently referred to as Section 2 and operating as Leilani Community Association. While many residents of both Section 1 and LCA may not have read or understood the various documents that created and set forth the laws under which LCA must operate, we hope this description will make understanding LCA clearer. The Board of Directors of LCA make no decisions that are outside the bounds of the Charter, Bylaws, and CC&Rs, and are sometimes mandated to make decisions that do seem harsh or offensive. Board members could face personal liabilities if found to be not making decisions in accordance with LCA regulations.

So, forward to our current post-eruption status, decisions about protecting the safety and welfare of LCA Members/owners from looters, squatters, trespassers, and excessive tourists, is a mandated duty of our Board. They represent the 2046 LCA properties defined in the Charter. For reference, there are 214 properties in Section 1. Those owners do not have any legal ownership or control over their roadways. This status has existed since the Leilani Estates was platted in 1960. 

Section 1, for decades could have made the choice to organize and improve their infrastructure but have chosen not to. They, however, need to understand that their decision may have not been the most prudent when faced with a disaster emergency such as Leilani Estates has just experienced. LCA has been more than willing to work with Section 1 but has been unanimously rebuffed. This response does not change the fact that LCA has to put in place protections against looting, squatting, trespassing, and excessive tourist activities on LCA or its Owner’s properties. It needs to be understood that LCA is only doing what they are mandated to do by their Charter.



Contact Us

Drop us a line!

Leilani Community Association

13-3441 Moku Street, Pahoa, Hawaii 96778, United States

(808) 965-9555
Email: lca@hawaii.rr.com

The Office reopens Monday, Sept. 24, 2018

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